Luvale/Lovale Makishi Mwana Pwevo mask, Zambia
ex Walking Man Gallery
ex Kaba Collection
originally collected in Zambia before 1960
This mask was in the exhibition "Collectors Collect - Works from Denver Private Collections", 2006/2007.

Mask portion measures 10 inches tall (the net is about 12 inches).
The stand shown in the photos is not included with the mask.

SOLD


This example conforms to a defined Lwena style. The consecutive arched beaded elements above the forehead
resemble the crowns worn by male and female chiefs. This version of a mature and accomplished woman would
have been created to honor a female chief or a woman in a royal lineage.

Bastin explains that a Lwena style of carving (related to that of the Chokwe) is distinguished by the "gentleness of its lines," a tendency toward
naturalism, and a taste for round and full forms. Lwena
Pwo masks sometimes incorporate tall, rounded coiffures.

Within a large repertoire of mask character types,
Pwo (Pwevo in Zambia)—the "woman" or female ancestor—and Mwana Pwo (Mwana Pwevo in
Zambia; —"the young woman"—actually perform a crucial role in transmitting culturally relevant information,mainly in the context of the
mukanda
male initiation. The "woman" and "young woman" masks represent ideal and comparable models for a "fulfilled" versus a "potential" woman.
Source: Chokwe!
For additional detail, click on any photo below to see the higher resolution version of the image.
For additional detail, click on any photo below to see the higher resolution version of the image.
Tribal Art magazine, Autumn/Winter 2008.